Sunday, January 23, 2011

The One Horse Open Sleigh (J. Pierpont)























So, I received my eBay copy of the William B. Bradbury tunebook, The Victory (1872 edition), and there on page 74 is James Pierpont's The One Horse Open Sleigh, a.k.a. Jingle Bells. Only with its original melody, which is different in spots from the one we know.

So I put together a recording, with me at the Casio WK-3800 (Patch 071). This is tricky to play, because the tenor part is up top on its own line (and notated an octave up in the treble clef), which makes putting all four voices together a royal pain, since the tenor has to be added to the bass, alto, and soprano, and played an octave lower than written. Therefore, I recorded this four bars at a time and joined the results together. Which is actually less of a hassle than renotating the thing for easier reading.

Except for a couple rushed measures, this came out nicely, I think. Consider it a late Christmas post:

The One Horse Open Sleigh (James Pierpont)


Now you say you've heard Jingle Bells in its original form. Unless you've heard it before, in which case you can say you've heard it again.


Lee

5 comments:

Crichton72 said...

Am I crazy or do I hear some "Jolly Old St. Nicholas" in there at times? Maybe, it served as some inspiration. Thanks for sharing.

Ernie said...

So when and how did it change into the current version entitled Jingle Bells? Was it changed by someone like Harry Simeone who just rearranged it a bit and called it his own?

Anonymous said...

Nice work, best post I've seen on a blog in a while.

Zepp said...

Firstly - I had to LOL -- the word verification for this comment post is "sucki" ..!

Wow .. that was fascinating .. seems like somewhere along the line, someone "simplified" the chorus, possibly for children to sing ...

Thank you so much for this

Bill from Illinois said...

Just now listened to this. Very cool, Lee -- thank you! I agree with Crichton72 that the chorus sounds a lot like "Jolly Old St. Nicholas," which as far as I know, dates from the late 19th or early 20th century, so whoever wrote that song could have borrowed from this one. Intriguing...